Margarita

Diets of the future are lessons from the past

1 post in this topic

diets_of_the_future.thumb.jpg.0d8334bc4b

It is indisputable that what we eat is critical to our state of health. Nutrients provide the body with the raw materials for our most basic functions. Essential nutrients are nutrients that the body requires for growth, development and functional maintenance. However many diets, particularly the Western diet, unfortunately lack some of these essential nutrients. Additionally, processed food high in fats and sugars that have been chemically changed, often to the point of becoming toxic, is consumed in increasingly large quantities.

As many functions of the body are interactive and interdependent, an imbalance of essential nutrients can have far-reaching negative effects. High levels of some substances found in processed or artificially ‘enhanced’ food may have the ability to alter our metabolic state and adversely affect our body’s functions. In obesity, an overweight but in some ways undernourished, state, the long term risk of chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes, heart disease and arthritis is vastly increased.[1] [2]

Until recently it was believed that a wide range of diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, stroke and some cancers could be caused by a single gene mutation. More recent findings, however, indicate that these conditions are attributable to a network of biological dysfunction. Furthermore, it is now also known that a lack of essential nutrients, caused by an inadequate supply in the diet, can be an important factor in this biological dysfunction.[3] In order to better understand and treat these diseases, intense research is required to identify how multiple nutrients interact, and how these interactions affect body functions.

As the relationship between nutrition, metabolic function and disease becomes more apparent, the view of the virtues of food in simplistic terms of calories or fat will no doubt require revision.[4] Focus must be drawn to food that it is essential to include, rather than just highlighting those to avoid. In the diet of the future, instead of looking at foodstuffs as the ‘enemy’, to be continually reduced or excluded, we will perhaps instead be directed to see the diet as a means to promote good health. By including the right kinds of foods we may even be able to decrease or eliminate the risk of many diseases that are currently epidemic in Western societies. Additionally, with the advent of personalised medicine and advances in genotyping, future diets may even be designed to coincide with an individual’s unique metabolism.[5]

There is increasing evidence of the adverse impact on health caused by food that is processed, or has a high sugar and fat content. As we find out more about the true, scientifically-backed ways to maintain a healthy diet, we can shape our health and even our future. Current thinking shows that a balanced and varied diet consisting of freshly prepared food from natural sources, rich in essential nutrients and free from pesticides is the most sensible option to maintain health.

 

[1] Li, YX. & Zhou, L. (2015) Vitamin D deficiency, obesity and diabetes. Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 61(3). 35-8.

[2] Han, TS. & Lean, ME. (2016) A clinical perspective of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. JRSM Cardiovasc Dis. doi: 10.1177/2048004016633371.

[3] American Heart Association Nutrition Committee et al. (2006) Diet and lifestyle recommendations revision 2006: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee. Circulation. 114(1). 82-96.

[4] Rozin, P. et al. (1999) Attitudes to Food and the Role of Food in Life in the U.S.A., Japan, Flemish Belgium and France: Possible Implications for the Diet–Health Debate. Appetite. 33(2). 163-80.

[5] Chadwick, R. (2004) Nutrigenomics, individualism and public health. Proceed Nutr Soc. 63(1). 161-6.
 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now